Anyone can submit writing to Nu?Detroit.

We want the voices here to reflect the powerful diversity of our community.

Whether commentary, opinion, analysis or just good storytelling, we are looking for writing that draws on:

Experience. Writing in the first person ("I statements") or otherwise drawing on your lived experience to inform your perspective on the subject.

Evidence. Observable and reputable context to help substantiate your point.

Empathy. Respecting and seeking to understand others' lenses, even if you are advocating for a particular point of view.

Don't hesitate to contact us if you have ideas or questions. Or so@nu-detroit.com if you have something you're ready to submit.


Comments

You may also decide to write in the form of comments in response to Nu?Detroit content. We are including a comments section in our launch with cautious optimism – and the expectation – that comments will be:

Relevant. Specifically engaging with the subject matter of the piece.

Rational. There are other places (most of the rest of the internet) for conspiracy theories, diatribes and ALL CAPS KEYBOARD POUNDING.

Respectful. You can disagree with the writing, but we will not tolerate any comments  disparaging or threatening the author – or anyone else.

Thank you in advance for your comment. You, specifically – in the spirit of transparency, ours and yours, we don't accept anonymous comments. If you don't want everyone to see your name (and us to see your email), that's probably a clue that you should keep your comment to yourself.


Ex-Pat Essays

Perhaps you or someone you rode the Dexter bus with might want to write a Dispatch from the Detroit Diaspora. Consider these prompts to help get your Vernors bubbly and your Sanders bumpy. Don’t think of these as Q&A, but rather as leaping off points for a “personal essay” (you get an A) that can be about pretty much anything you want to share with hometown and far-flung readers:

A Hometown Memory Moment. A metro-Detroit moment-in-time that you have carried with you to your new environs.

A Jewish geography meet-cute. A chance encounter, rendezvous, fix-up or collaboration with someone else from home, however fleeting or enduring.

Done raised right. When an experience, skill or lesson from the "village" that raised you served you well in a surprising (or unsurprising) way.

Curating community. A practice or custom you've cultivated for upport, ritual or good humor in a new place.

C’mon, kvell. Share something exciting you’re working on. Don’t be so humble—you’re not that great.